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How To Negotiate A Bargain

You’ve heard Dave say that you need to negotiate in order to get a good deal. If you’ve never tried to wheel and deal before, the very thought of it can be intimidating. But, it certainly doesn’t have to be that way—once you learn the rules of negotiating, you’ll become a bargaining pro!

When you set out to search for a bargain, always keep in mind the three ground rules for proper negotiation:

  1. Never misrepresent the truth while bargaining.
  2. Never have intentions to harm the other party.
  3. Create a win-win deal.

Flash the Cash

Dave has found that win-win deals really work, so don’t be afraid to ask for a deal. And learn how to use the power of cash. Cash is emotional, visual and has immediacy, so use it to your advantage!

Demonstrate Patience

Remember that you need to demonstrate patience when hunting for a good bargain. Never get married to a purchase. If that happens, your chances of getting a good deal are slim. Know when to exercise walk-away power, and use it when necessary. If you can show that you have the ability to say no, then you hold the upper hand in the bargain. Dave’s key phrase is “That’s not good enough!” After you exclaim that, shut up. Sometimes silence can be the key to getting the deal you want.

Find the Deals

A final key to finding good bargains is to know where to find deals. Common places to find great deals include:

  • Garage/estates sales
  • Public/online auctions
  • Coupons
  • Individuals
  • Repo lots
  • Flea markets
  • Refunds/rebates
  • Foreclosures
  • Pawn shops
  • Classified ads
  • Consignment shops
  • Conventions

Keep in mind that you can always trade something of value when trying to negotiate. Consider exchanging something you own or barter your services in exchange for a good bargain. Babysitting, running errands, and mowing a lawn make great trade services.

But the most important thing to remember when trying to get a good deal is to ask yourself, “Can I use this? Do I really need this?” If it’s something you don’t need or can’t use then it’s not a good deal.

For more great bargaining tips, check out Dave’s Financial Peace University. In this class, he reveals the power and influence that marketing has on your everyday buying decisions, as well as the seldom-used secrets of buying only big, big bargains.

 

Source https://www.daveramsey.com/blog/how-to-negotiate-a-bargain


Key Tuberculosis Facts

  • A total of 1.5 million people died from TB in 2018 (including 251 000 people with HIV). Worldwide, TB is one of the top 10 causes of death and the leading cause from a single infectious agent (above HIV/AIDS).
  • In 2018, an estimated 10 million people fell ill with tuberculosis(TB) worldwide. 5.7 million men, 3.2 million women and 1.1 million children. There were cases in all countries and age groups. But TB is curable and preventable
  • In 2018, 1.1 million children fell ill with TB globally, and there were 205 000 child deaths due to TB (including among children with HIV). Child and adolescent TB is often overlooked by health providers and can be difficult to diagnose and treat.
  • In 2018, the 30 high TB burden countries accounted for 87% of new TB cases. Eight countries account for two thirds of the total, with India leading the count, followed by, China, Indonesia, the Philippines, Pakistan, Nigeria, Bangladesh and South Africa.
  • Multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) remains a public health crisis and a health security threat. WHO estimates that there were 484 000 new cases with resistance to rifampicin – the most effective first-line drug, of which 78% had MDR-TB.
  • Globally, TB incidence is falling at about 2% per year. This needs to accelerate to a 4–5% annual decline to reach the 2020 milestones of the End TB Strategy.
  • An estimated 58 million lives were saved through TB diagnosis and treatment between 2000 and 2018.
  • Ending the TB epidemic by 2030 is among the health targets of the Sustainable Development Goals.

Source https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/tuberculosis


Facts, Symptoms, and Causes of CKD

The Facts About Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

  • 37 million American adults have CKD and millions of others are at increased risk.
  • Early detection can help prevent the progression of kidney disease to kidney failure.
  • Heart disease is the major cause of death for all people with CKD.
  • Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is the best estimate of kidney function.
  • Hypertension causes CKD and CKD causes hypertension.
  • Persistent proteinuria (protein in the urine) means CKD is present.
  • High risk groups include those with diabetes, hypertension and family history of kidney failure.
  • African Americans, Hispanics, Pacific Islanders, American Indians and Seniors are at increased risk.
  • Two simple tests can detect CKD: blood pressure, urine albumin and serum creatinine.

What causes CKD?

The two main causes of chronic kidney disease are diabetes and high blood pressure, which are responsible for up to two-thirds of the cases. Diabetes happens when your blood sugar is too high, causing damage to many organs in your body, including the kidneys and heart, as well as blood vessels, nerves and eyes. High blood pressure, or hypertension, occurs when the pressure of your blood against the walls of your blood vessels increases. If uncontrolled, or poorly controlled, high blood pressure can be a leading cause of heart attacks, strokes and chronic kidney disease. Also, chronic kidney disease can cause high blood pressure.

Other conditions that affect the kidneys are:

  • Glomerulonephritis, a group of diseases that cause inflammation and damage to the kidney’s filtering units. These disorders are the third most common type of kidney disease.
  • Inherited diseases, such as polycystic kidney disease, which causes large cysts to form in the kidneys and damage the surrounding tissue.
  • Malformations that occur as a baby develops in its mother’s womb. For example, a narrowing may occur that prevents normal outflow of urine and causes urine to flow back up to the kidney. This causes infections and may damage the kidneys.
  • Lupus and other diseases that affect the body’s immune system.
  • Obstructions caused by problems like kidney stones, tumors or an enlarged prostate gland in men.
  • Repeated urinary infections.

What are the symptoms of CKD?

Most people may not have any severe symptoms until their kidney disease is advanced. However, you may notice that you:

  • feel more tired and have less energy
  • have trouble concentrating
  • have a poor appetite
  • have trouble sleeping
  • have muscle cramping at night
  • have swollen feet and ankles
  • have puffiness around your eyes, especially in the morning
  • have dry, itchy skin
  • need to urinate more often, especially at night.

Anyone can get chronic kidney disease at any age. However, some people are more likely than others to develop kidney disease. You may have an increased risk for kidney disease if you:

  • have diabetes
  • have high blood pressure
  • have a family history of kidney failure
  • are older
  • belong to a population group that has a high rate of diabetes or high blood pressure, such as African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Asian, Pacific Islanders, and American Indians.

Source https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/about-chronic-kidney-disease



Go Red for Women®

Go Red for Women®

Go Red for Women® is the American Heart Association’s global initiative to end heart disease and stroke in women. Launched in 2004 to close the gap in awareness, Go Red quickly expanded into a worldwide movement dedicated to removing the barriers women face to achieving good health and wellbeing.

Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women, killing more women than all forms of cancer combined. Learn what it means to Go Red For Women to help women like you fight back:

G: GET YOUR NUMBERS

Ask your doctor to check your blood pressure and cholesterol.

O: OWN YOUR LIFESTYLE

Stop smoking, lose weight, exercise, and eat healthy.

It’s up to you. No one can do it for you.

R: REALIZE YOUR RISK

We think it won’t happen to us, but heart disease kills one of three women.

E: EDUCATE YOUR FAMILY

Make healthy food choices for you and your family.

Teach your kids the importance of staying active.

D: DON’T BE SILENT

Tell every woman you know that heart disease is our No. 1 killer.

Source https://newsroom.heart.org/events/february-2020-american-heart-month-and-go-red-for-women


15 Tips for Eating Healthy on a Budget

We hear it all the time: “Eating healthy on a budget is impossible!” And the truth is—nope, it’s not. Did you know plenty of healthy foods are actually budget friendly? It’s true! You know what isn’t budget friendly? Processed junk. Yeah, we said it.

And get this . . . we’re not talking about only beans and rice here (although, that’s a perfect example of healthy and cheap). There are plenty of ways you can stick to eating healthy on a budget!

Cheap Foods for Eating Healthy on a Budget

We’ve said it before, and we’ll say it again: Rice and beans are healthy for you, and they’re pretty dang cheap too. Cook up a veggie medley on the side, and you’ve got yourself a super inexpensive and healthy meal. You can even get fancy and do black beans and brown rice. Throw in some salsa and have yourself a fiesta.

But you don’t have to survive on just beans and rice to master eating healthy on a budget. Here are some budget-friendly ingredients to add to your grocery list:

  • Eggs
  • Multigrain pasta
  • Multigrain bread
  • Oats
  • Russet potatoes
  • Cottage cheese
  • Spinach
  • Tuna
  • Dried lentils
  • Baby carrots
  • Apples
  • Bananas
  • Brown rice
  • Chicken breast
  • Apples
  • Cabbage
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Oranges
  • Kale
  • Peanut butter
  • Broccoli
  • Onions
  • Dried beans
  • Quinoa
  • Yogurt
  • Frozen fruits
  • Frozen vegetables

Best Places to Buy Cheap Groceries

There’s no denying marketing works—even food marketing. Somehow, we’ve gotten it into our heads that in order to “eat healthy,” we have to shop for groceries at the well-known, specialty “healthy grocery stores” (you know the places).

Those kinds of stores might have things on sale, sure. But there’s no need to do all your grocery shopping for the week there. And guess what! Lots of other stores sell fruits, veggies and other healthy food items at slashed prices too. Here are the top 13 American grocery stores with the cheapest prices!1 You can use this as your go-to grocery store list when eating healthy on a budget:

  1. Aldi
  2. Market Basket
  3. WinCo Foods
  4. Food 4 Less
  5. Costco
  6. Walmart
  7. Trader Joe’s
  8. Walmart Neighborhood Market
  9. Lidl
  10. Amazon
  11. H-E-B
  12. Peapod
  13. Sam’s Club

 

15 Tips for Eating Healthy on a Budget

1. Plan your meals.

That’s right—it’s meal prep time! And guess what? It really isn’t as hard as you might think it is. Making a plan for your meals is kind of like making a plan with your budget. It might take some practice at first, but once you get the hang of it, you’ll be golden!

Spend one night a week planning the meals you want to make for the next seven days. Depending on when you go grocery shopping, these meals might use up what’s left in your fridge or be based around your grocery shopping list for the week. Either way, just make sure you have a plan and stick to it.

 

2. Shop for produce that’s in season.

Shopping for a watermelon in December is probably going to cost you—and will it even taste good? We’re willing to bet it probably won’t. Unless you have a pregnant woman in your house who has to have watermelon this very instant, just skip it and shop for fruits and veggies that are actually in season. Your wallet will thank you!

A great place to buy produce in season is your local farmers market. Now, not everything at a farmers market is going to be cheap. But hear us out—you never know what you’re going to find.

Walk around the entire place before you buy anything. This way, you can take note of who has the best-looking food at the best prices. Some vendors will even cut you a deal if you buy multiple items or pay in cash. And if you head to the market later in the day, prices may be marked down to help them sell the last of their items.

You don’t need to do all your produce shopping at a farmers market. Just stick to grabbing a few essentials that fit in your budget. Don’t forget—you can always negotiate prices too.

Bonus tip: Buy extra of the fruits and veggies that are in season and freeze them. You can enjoy them over time and not feel rushed to eat five containers of strawberries before they go bad.

 

3. Stop buying processed food.

Hey, you know what isn’t healthy and racks up your food budget? Processed food. We’re talking about things like chicken nuggets and pizza pockets, refined sugars, boxed mashed potatoes, frozen dinners, prepackaged meals, cookies, hot dogs, potato chips and other salty snacks. They’re not cheap, and they’re not doing your health any favors, either. And you’re trying to eat healthy here, remember?

A good rule of thumb: Stick to the outer edges of the grocery store when you shop. The closer you go toward the middle aisles, the more processed the food gets.

 

4. Go meatless.

It’s no secret that eating meat all the time isn’t the healthiest option. Give your body and budget a break and go meatless for a while. Maybe that means you cut it out for the month (gasp) or just go a few nights a week without it. There are other (cheaper!) ways to get protein these days, like dried beans and lentils.

When you do buy meat, just be picky about what you purchase. Stick to lean cuts of meat that are on sale.

 

5. Make enough food for leftovers.

Making healthy food at home—win. Making healthy food at home with plenty left over for meals during the week—double win. Be on the lookout for meals that can feed you and your family for days on end. Meals like chili, stews and casseroles are going to be your best friends in this department. Slow cooker and Instant Pot recipes are great for this too!

 

6. Don’t eat out.

Yes, this no-brainer did make our list. Even though we all know this is a huge part of eating healthy on a budget, not enough of us actually make it a priority and stick to it. When you’re super hungry, it’s just a little too easy to swing by the drive-thru or build-your-own-burrito line. But just because it’s easy doesn’t mean it’s the wisest decision.

You know what’s an unexpected side effect of following Dave Ramsey’s plan to become debt-free? Losing weight! It’s true. A lot of people who go through Financial Peace University and start living on a budget find they’re not only shedding the debt but they’re also shedding the pounds!

“When we started Financial Peace University in July of 2017, we were so incredibly excited to start eliminating debt! After a couple of months of following our budget well, including what we spent on groceries and on carryout food, we found ourselves slowly becoming more and more healthy as we both started to lose weight! Seventy-five pounds down later between my husband and I combined, we are $40,000 down in debt with $19,000 more to go and healthier than we’ve ever been!”

— Amanda H.

7. Bring your own lunch and snacks.

Think about it: If you’re packing your own snacks, you’ll probably be more likely to reach for the carrot sticks and hummus. If you wait until you’re standing in front of the work vending machine, your options are basically just potato chips or crackers—and it’s going to cost more too.

 

8. Stop buying soda.

It’s crazy how easy it is to drink your calories (and drain your budget) just by pumping your body full of soda. Even “healthy” fruit juices can be packed full of sugar.

To save cash (and calories), try switching to water and straight-up black coffee as your beverages of choice. It might sound like weird and unusual torture at first, but you’ll be surprised by the big impact it can have over the long haul.

 

9. Buy in bulk.

Buying food in bulk can be great, but we fully admit it doesn’t always make sense for your budget or your health. So, let’s just be clear: We’re not talking about the 60-ounce bag of caramel kettle corn here. But if you notice the go-to hummus you eat every single day is $4 for 10 ounces, but it’s $6 for 32 ounces, then maybe that’s worth the bulk buy.

Keep your eyes peeled for good deals, crunch some numbers, and you might just find yourself some bargains!

10. Check the clearance aisle.

Yeah, we’re serious. Did you know most grocery stores have some kind of clearance aisle or dedicated manager’s markdown shelf? There might be random things you don’t need, but every now and again, you can find bread, meat, spices and even produce that the store needs to clear out ASAP. Their markdown is your gain! Just be sure to check expiration dates.

 

11. Buy generic.

If you’ve been around here for more than five seconds, you’ve probably heard us sing the praises of opting for generic items instead of name-brand products. And there’s good reason for it—more often than not, generic items are cheaper and taste just as good as their competitors.

But are they just as healthy? The answer here is simple: You’ll need to read the labels and check.

 

12. Don’t buy everything organic.

“It’s organic! It’s better for you! Price doesn’t matter! Buy it now!” Sound familiar? Listen, we aren’t here to argue with health-food gurus about the benefits of organic products. But just keep in mind you don’t have to buy everything organic.

A great rule of thumb is to buy organic fruits and vegetables if you eat the skin (think apples, strawberries, cucumbers, zucchini). For produce that you have to peel or cut open (oranges, watermelon, cantaloupe, avocados), you don’t have to go organic.

And if you really want to do a deeper dive, check out something called the Dirty Dozen. It’s a list of the top 12 worst fruits and veggies covered with pesticides. Yuck! Two words to combat that: veggie wash.

If you still want to go organic but can’t stomach the cost, look for organic fruits and vegetables in the frozen aisle. You can get way more bang for your buck there! And what about the vitamins and nutrients in frozen produce? Despite what Grandma always said, one study found that frozen fruits and veggies don’t lose their nutritional value!2

 

13. Stay away from high-priced ingredients.

You’ve stopped going out to eat and are pretty proud of yourself. Not only are you saving money and dropping pounds but you’re becoming something of a wiz in the kitchen too. You can’t wait to impress your friends with your Bluefin Tuna Tartare recipe.

But hold it there, Julia Child. Make sure you’re not buying pricey specialty ingredients that you’ll only use once in these to-die-for recipes. Things like specialty cheeses, spices and meats can really send your grocery budget overboard.

 

14. Dilute your drinks.

So, you’ve (reluctantly) sacrificed the soda, but you’ve replaced it with juice and kombucha. Okay . . . points for being healthier, but those drinks are still going to add up in your grocery budget.

To save you some dough, try to stretch them out by diluting your kombucha with mineral water (it’ll still be fizzy) and cutting the juice with water (it’ll cut the sugar too).

 

15. Buy ingredients you can repurpose.

This one is super fun and makes having leftovers feel less left over. Let’s say you decided to cook up a whole chicken for dinner one night. You and your fam eat some slices of meat, but there’s a ton of chicken left over. Nice!

The next night, take that leftover chicken, shred it up, and make tacos. On day three, toss the bones in the Instant Pot and make some bone broth to use as the base of the soup you eat that night.

Boom! You just got three meals (and maybe even some leftovers for lunch) out of that one whole chicken!

How Do You Budget for Food When You’re on a Diet?

Keto. Paleo. Whole30. Gluten free. Vegan. There are plenty of different diets to follow out there—and they all can impact your budget. Whether you’re following a specific diet because you want to lose 15 pounds, because of a food allergy, or just because it makes you feel better, here are a few things to keep in mind:

  • Look for places that offer cheaper versions of the food you need. Gluten-free bread is expensive, but stores like Costco and Aldi have cheaper options than many other specialty stores.
  • Avoid diets that make you purchase “their food.” If you find it’s truly a must-have to eat a company-based product in order to stick to the diet, then add a line item to your budget specifically for your special diet. This is where you’ll budget for those shakes and bars that companies sell.
  • If you can, stick to simple and skip the fad diets. Eat less sugar, drink more water, up the protein, cut the carbs, and eat more fruits and veggies.

Eating Healthy on a Budget—You’ve Got This!

We know it doesn’t always feel like it, but eating healthy on a budget is totally doable! Just like everything else that truly matters in life, it requires being intentional, planning ahead and making the tough choices. But don’t let that scare you away from giving it a go. Give these tips and tricks a shot and see if you find it easier to figure out how to eat healthy on a budget. You can do it!

 

Source https://www.daveramsey.com/blog/eating-healthy-on-a-budget


General Donation Questions

What organs and tissues can be donated?

  • Eight vital organs can be donated: heart, kidneys (2), pancreas, lungs (2), liver, and intestines. Hands and faces have also recently been added to the list.
  • Tissue: cornea, skin, heart valves, bone, blood vessels, and connective tissue
  • Bone marrow and stem cells, umbilical cord blood, peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC)

If I’m a registered donor, will it affect the medical care I receive at the hospital?

No! The medical team trying to save your life is separate from the transplant team. Every effort is made to save your life before donation becomes a possibility.

Will donation disfigure my body? Can there be an open casket funeral?

Donation does not interfere with having an open casket service. Surgical techniques are used to retrieve organs and tissues, and all incisions are closed.

Are there any costs to my family for donation?

No. Your family pays for your medical care and funeral costs, but not for organ donation. Costs related to donation are paid by the recipient, usually through insurance, Medicare, or Medicaid.

Can I sell my organs?

No! The National Organ Transplant Act (Public Law 98-507) makes it illegal to sell human organs and tissues in the United States. Violators are subject to fines and imprisonment.

One reason Congress made this law was to make sure the wealthy do not have an unfair advantage for obtaining donated organs and tissues. (Source: OPTN white paper on bioethics—Financial Incentives for Organ Donation, June 30, 1993)

 

 

Source https://www.organdonor.gov/about/facts-terms/donation-faqs.html


Cancer Prevention and Risk Reduction

At least one third of cancers are preventable giving us every reason to champion healthy choices and prevention strategies for all, so that we have the best chance to prevent and reduce our cancer risks.

Choosing your health

Not every type of cancer is preventable but we do know we can prevent many cancers through lifestyle choices alone. According to the World Health Organization, at least one third of common cancers are preventable1 through a healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight and being physically active.

Smoking

Tobacco use is the single largest preventable cause of cancer and stopping smoking is one of the best things we can do to reduce our risk of cancer. Use of tobacco has been found to cause around 15 different types of cancer including oral cancers, lung, liver, stomach, bowel and ovarian cancers, as well as some types of leukaemia (cancers of the blood)2. Quitting at any age can make huge a difference, increasing your life expectancy and improving quality of life3.

Alcohol

Alcohol is strongly linked with an increased risk of several cancers. By reducing and limiting how much you drink, you can reduce your risk of cancers of the mouth, pharynx, larynx, oesophagus, bowel and breast, and may also reduce the risk of liver and bowel cancers.

Physical activity

Maintaining a healthy weight and making physical activity part of your everyday life can help reduce your risk of ten cancers, which include bowel, breast, uterine, ovarian, pancreatic, oesophagus, kidney, liver, advanced prostate and gallbladder cancers6,7.

Ultraviolet radiation

No matter where you live or your skin tone, moderate your exposure to ultraviolet radiation from the sun and avoid tanning beds and solariums to help reduce your risk of skin cancer8. Staying under the shade, covering up your skin and avoiding prolonged periods of exposure to the sun are some ways to help protect yourself. 

 

Fast fact: Smoking is linked to 71%4 of lung cancer deaths, and accounts for at least 22% of all cancer deaths5. 

 

Workplace hazards

Some people risk being exposed to a cancer-causing substance because of the work that they do. For example, workers in the chemical dye industry have been found to have a higher incidence than normal of bladder cancer. Asbestos is a well-known workplace cause of cancer – particularly a cancer called mesothelioma, which most commonly affects the covering of the lungs. In this case, asbestos isn’t just present in workplaces but can also be found in older homes and buildings.

Get vaccinated

Chronic infections (commonly caused by viruses) are estimated to cause approximately 16% of all cancers globally. Some of the most common forms of cancers such as liver, cervical and stomach cancers are associated with infections with the hepatitis B virus (HBV), the human papillomavirus (HPV), and the bacterium Helicobacter pylori virus (H, pylori), respectively. Today, there are safe and effective vaccines against HBV and HPV, which can help to protect against the infection-related cancers of liver and cervical cancers.

Source https://www.worldcancerday.org/prevention-and-risk-reduction


Myths, Misinformation and Stigma

Myths, misinformation and stigma

Some common myths and misconceptions about cancer – including that there is no cure or there is nothing that can be done about cancer – can understandably cause fear. However, misinformation, misconceptions and stigma around cancer creates a negative cycle that further acts to confirm our fears. Our fears can prevent us from seeking early detection, or to delay or avoid treatment and care altogether. Often, by receiving diagnosis at a late stage or not seeking treatment at all, this can result in worse outcomes, which in turn perpetuates the myths and misconception of cancer being incurable or untreatable.

Source https://www.worldcancerday.org/awareness-understanding-myths-and-misinformation-0


Protecting Your Child’s Teeth

Even though tooth decay—or cavities—has been on the decline for the past 30 years, it is still one of the most common chronic diseases for kids from age 6 to 19.

Protect your child’s teeth by following the tips below:

  • Have your child drink tap water that contains fluoride. To see if your community’s water is fluoridated, you can view your water system on CDC’s My Water’s Fluoride website. You can also call your water utility company and request a copy of the utility’s most recent “Consumer Confidence Report.” This report provides information on the level of fluoride in your drinking (tap) water.

 

  • If your drinking water does not have enough fluoride to prevent tooth decay (the optimal amount of 0.7 milligrams per Liter), ask your dentist, pediatrician, family doctor, or nurse if your child needs oral fluoride supplements, such as drops, tablets, or lozenges.

 

  • Make sure your child brushes their teeth twice a day with fluoride toothpaste.

 

  • If your child is younger than 2 years, consult first with your doctor or dentist regarding the use of fluoride toothpaste. Clean your child’s teeth every day as soon as the first tooth appears by brushing without toothpaste with a small, soft-bristled toothbrush and plain water.

 

  • If your child is younger than 6 years, watch your child brush their teeth. Make sure your child only uses a pea-sized amount of toothpaste and always spits it out rather than swallows it. Help your child brush until she has good brushing skills.

 

  • Talk to your dentist, pediatrician, family doctor, or nurse about putting fluoride varnish on your child’s teeth as soon as the first tooth appears.

 

  • By the time your child is 1 year of age, the American Academy of Pediatrics’s Brushing Up on Oral Health: Never Too Early to Start recommends that your child visit a dentist for an initial check-up. Your child’s chance of getting cavities can be higher if:
    • Family members (older brothers, sisters, or parents) have cavities.
    • They eat and drink a lot of sugary foods and drinks, like soda, especially between meals.
    • They have special health care needs.
    • They wear braces or orthodontics or oral appliances.

If any of these apply to your child, be sure to talk with your dentist, pediatrician, or family doctor to make sure you are taking extra steps to protect your child’s teeth.

Source https://www.cdc.gov/oralhealth/basics/childrens-oral-health/fl_caries.htm