National Health Observances

Eye Injury Facts and Myths

Eye Injury Facts and Myths

  • Men are more likely to sustain an eye injury than women.
  • Most people believe that eye injuries are most common on the job — especially in the course of work at factories and construction sites. But, in fact, nearly half (44.7 percent) of all eye injuries occurred in the home, as reported during the fifth-annual Eye Injury Snapshot (conducted by the American Academy of Ophthalmology and the American Society of Ocular Trauma).
  • More than 40 percent of eye injuries reported in the Eye Injury Snapshot were caused by projects and activities such as home repairs, yard work, cleaning and cooking. More than a third (34.2 percent) of injuries in the home occurred in living areas such as the kitchen, bedroom, bathroom, living or family room.
  • More than 40 percent of eye injuries every year are related to sports or recreational activities.
  • Eyes can be damaged by sun exposure, not just chemicals, dust or objects.
  • Among all eye injuries reported in the Eye Injury Snapshot, more than 78 percent of people were not wearing eyewear at the time of injury. Of those reported to be wearing eyewear of some sort at the time of injury (including glasses or contact lenses), only 5.3 percent were wearing safety or sports glasses.

Source https://www.aao.org/eye-health/diseases/preventing-injuries


Eye Safety at Home

Believe it or not, the average home is full of dangers that often go unnoticed.

In fact, accidents involving common household products cause 125,000 eye injuries each year.

Ninety percent of these eye injures can be prevented through understanding, safety practices and the use of proper eye protection.

You can reduce the risks of eye injuries for yourself and other family members by using this simple checklist for different areas of your home:

Indoor Safety

·         Provide lights and handrails to improve safety on stairs.

Outdoor Safety

·         Inspect and remove debris from lawns before mowing.

·         Keep paints, pesticides, fertilizers, and similar products properly stored in a secure area.

·         Keep your tools in good condition; damaged tools should be repaired or replaced.

·         Wear safety glasses or dust goggles to protect against flying particles, and chemical goggles to guard against exposure to fertilizers and pesticides.

Chemical Safety

·         Wear chemical safety goggles when using hazardous solvents and detergents.

·         Read and follow all manufacturer instructions and warning labels.

·         Do not mix cleaning agents.

·         Know that regular eyeglasses don’t always provide enough protection.

Source https://www.preventblindness.org/eye-safety-home 


What Can I Do to Reduce My Risk of Breast Cancer?

Many factors over the course of a lifetime can influence your breast cancer risk. You can’t change some factors, such as getting older or your family history, but you can help lower your risk of breast cancer by taking care of your health in the following ways—

·         Keep a healthy weight.

·         Exercise regularly (at least four hours a week).

·         Research shows that lack of nighttime sleep can be a risk factor.

·         Don’t drink alcohol, or limit alcoholic drinks to no more than one per day.

·         Avoid exposure to chemicals that can cause cancer (carcinogens)and chemicals that interfere with the normal function of the body.

·         Limit exposure to radiation from medical imaging tests like X-rays, CT scans, and PET scans if not medically necessary.

·         If you are taking, or have been told to take, hormone replacement therapy or oral contraceptives(birth control pills), ask your doctor about the risks and find out if it is right for you.

·         Breastfeed any children you may have, if possible.

If you have a family history of breast cancer or inherited changes in your BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, you may be at high risk for getting breast cancer. Talk to your doctor about more ways to lower your risk.

Staying healthy throughout your life will lower your risk of developing cancer, and improve your chances of surviving cancer if it occurs.

Source https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/basic_info/prevention.htm


What Can I Do to Reduce My Risk of Breast Cancer?

Many factors over the course of a lifetime can influence your breast cancer risk. You can’t change some factors, such as getting older or your family history, but you can help lower your risk of breast cancer by taking care of your health in the following ways—

·         Keep a healthy weight.

·         Exercise regularly (at least four hours a week).

·         Research shows that lack of nighttime sleep can be a risk factor.

·         Don’t drink alcohol, or limit alcoholic drinks to no more than one per day.

·         Avoid exposure to chemicals that can cause cancer (carcinogens)and chemicals that interfere with the normal function of the body.

·         Limit exposure to radiation from medical imaging tests like X-rays, CT scans, and PET scans if not medically necessary.

·         If you are taking, or have been told to take, hormone replacement therapy or oral contraceptives(birth control pills), ask your doctor about the risks and find out if it is right for you.

·         Breastfeed any children you may have, if possible.

If you have a family history of breast cancer or inherited changes in your BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, you may be at high risk for getting breast cancer. Talk to your doctor about more ways to lower your risk.

Staying healthy throughout your life will lower your risk of developing cancer, and improve your chances of surviving cancer if it occurs.

Source https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/basic_info/prevention.htm