Articles

Vaccines for Adults

You’re not a kid anymore, so you don’t have to worry about shots, right? Wrong. Find out how to stay on top of your vaccines.

 

What vaccines do adults need?

Vaccines for adults are recommended based on your age, prior vaccinations, health, lifestyle, occupation and travel destinations.

The schedule is updated every year, and changes range from the addition of a new vaccine to tweaks of current recommendations. To determine exactly which vaccines you need now and which vaccines are coming up, check the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s website.

 

What factors might affect my vaccine recommendations?

Several factors can affect whether you need certain vaccines. Be sure to tell your doctor if you:

·         Are planning to travel abroad

·         Have had your spleen removed

·         Work in certain occupations where exposures could occur

·         Are or might be pregnant

·         Are breast-feeding

·         Are moderately or severely ill or have a chronic illness

·         Have any severe allergies, including a serious allergic reaction to a previous dose of a vaccine

·         Have had a disorder in which your body’s immune system attacks your nerves, such as Guillain-Barre syndrome

·         Have a weakened immune system or are being treated with an immunosuppressant

·         Have recently had another vaccine

·         Have recently had a transfusion or received other blood products

·         Have a personal or family history of seizures

 

Your doctor might also recommend certain vaccines based on your sexual activity. Vaccinations can protect you from hepatitis A and hepatitis B, serious liver infections that can spread through sexual contact. The HPV vaccine is recommended for men up to age 21 and women up to age 26.

 

Why are some vaccines particularly important for adults?

Adults of any age can benefit from vaccines. However, certain diseases, such as the flu, can be particularly serious for older adults or those living with certain chronic illnesses.

 

How can I keep track of my vaccines?

To gather information about your vaccination status, talk to your parents or other caregivers. Check with your doctor’s office, as well as any previous doctors’ offices, schools and employers. Some states also have registries that include adult immunizations. To check, contact your state health department.

If you can’t find your records, talk to your doctor. He or she might be able to do blood tests to see if you are immune to certain diseases that can be prevented by vaccines. You might need to get some vaccines again.

To stay on top of your vaccines, ask your doctor for an immunization record form. Bring the form with you to all of your doctor visits and ask your provider to sign and date the form for each vaccine you receive.

Source https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/in-depth/vaccines/art-20046750

 


Taking Your Best Shot

Thanks to vaccines, we can protect young infants against whooping cough by making sure everyone is up to date with their vaccines. Pregnant women can pass on protection to their newborns by getting vaccinated during their third trimester every pregnancy. Family members and caregivers can strengthen that protection by getting up-to-date on the whooping cough vaccine, which helps prevent the spread of this life-threatening disease to infants and their mothers.

Whooping cough is just one of several vaccine-preventable diseases that threaten Americans. Outbreaks continue to occur, and many vaccine-preventable diseases remain common. Consider pneumococcal disease, which affects nearly 4 million Americans each year and can cause pneumonia or infections of the ears, blood and brain. Or that 1 in 3 Americans each year will develop shingles, which can lead to debilitating pain that lasts for weeks, months and, in rare cases, years.

Vaccines are safe, effective and the best protection against these diseases—from infancy to early adulthood and into old age. By getting vaccinated, we not only protect ourselves, we help stop the spread of disease to our children, families and communities. But, for vaccines to be most effective, vaccination rates must remain high.

We must be persistent in raising awareness about immunizations and encouraging timely vaccination. Every August is dedicated to National Immunization Awareness Month (NIAM). NIAM is an annual observance designed to highlight the importance of immunizations. Each week of the month underscores the benefits of vaccination for people of all ages—including infants, children, teens, pregnant women and adults.

 Source https://www.hhs.gov/blog/2018/08/01/honor-national-immunization-awareness-month.html


Chronic Intestinal Pseudo Obstruction

Chronic Intestinal Pseudo Obstruction

Chronic Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction (CIP) refers to a group of rare motility disorders characterized by persistent signs and symptoms of intestinal blockage in the absence of any physical blockage. In those with CIP, nerve or muscle problems cause the small and/or large intestine to lose the ability to contract and/or push food, fluid, stool, and air through the gastrointestinal tract.

CIP shares many symptoms with more common GI disorders which, combined with many physicians’ unfamiliarity with CIP and the complexity of diagnostic testing, results in what is often a difficult and delayed path to proper diagnosis.

CIP has a variety of different causes and ranges greatly in its severity. Treatment focuses on symptom management and meeting nutritional needs and can be immensely challenging. Despite utilization of the best available interventions, CIP can have a devastating impact on quality-of-life for patients as well as their families; in rare instances complications related to CIP itself or necessary treatments can even be life- threatening.

CIP Symptoms

Symptoms of CIP include:

  • Abdominal Distention/ Bloating
  • Abdominal Obstructions/Blockages
  • Early Satiety
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Heartburn
  • Abdominal Pain
  • Constipation
  • Weight Loss
  • Chest Pain/Esophageal Spasms (may feel like a heart attack)
  • Decreased or no Bowel Sounds
  • Inability to pass gas
  • Poor Appetite
  • Malabsorption
  • Vitamin Deficiencies
  • Fatigue
  • Diarrhea (less common)
  • Poor Growth and/or Development (children)

It is not unusual for those with CIP to have other portions of the GI tract also affected; this may include Dysmotility in the esophagus and/or stomach (Gastroparesis) and, for some, includes problems with bladder emptying as well.

Source https://www.g-pact.org/chronic-intestinal-pseudo-obstruction


Colonic Inertia

Colonic Inertia

Colonic Inertia (also known as slow-transit constipation) is a motility disorder that affects the large intestine (colon) and results in the abnormal passage of stool.    It is a rare condition in which the colon ceases to function normally.

In colonic inertia, stool may remain stored in portions of the colon and not progress adequately to the part of the colon (rectosigmoid) responsible for the propulsion and transfer of stool out of the body – the processes involved in defecation.

Colonic inertia is characterized by severe, unremitting constipation, abdominal distention, and abdominal pain.  Individuals with colonic inertia often do not pass a stool for 7–10 days at a time and sometimes longer.

Sometimes colonic inertia is accompanied by abnormalities in motility of the upper intestine including delayed emptying of the stomach (gastroparesis) and small intestinal pseudo-obstruction (a disorder that causes symptoms of blockage, but no actual blockage).

Colonic inertia differs from regular constipation in that the latter patients have normal colonic transit times.

Colonic Inertia Symptoms

It has been determined that the normal frequency of stool passage in the United States is 3 or more bowel movements per week.

Patients with colonic inertia have a long delay in passage of stool.

Symptoms can include:

  • Severe, unremitting constipation
  • Diarrhea (most often called overflow diarrhea due to constipation)
  • Abdominal pain
  • Abdominal bloating
  • Nausea and or vomiting
  • Excessive gas

Source https://www.g-pact.org/colonic-inertia


Do You Need A Wellness Expert?

meditationYou know the feeling. You aren’t sick, yet you really don’t feel good, either. You feel stressed and basically out of sorts. If you’ve had regular check-ups and there’s nothing wrong, maybe you need a wellness expert. What does a wellness expert do? He or she helps people make lasting changes in their life that improve their health in the future. These positive changes can include everything from eating healthier and exercise to improving their mindset and reducing stress.

It’s not all about medication.

Sometimes, meditation is medication. That’s especially true for stress related illness. Food as Medicine is a new area in medical care. Exercise can boost your energy and improve your health. Taking care of yourself should be a top priority. Everyone is rushed today and often feel uncomfortable focusing on their own needs. In reality, it’s the most important thing anyone can do. If you aren’t functioning at your peak, you’ll accomplish less. People fail to realize that everything done on a daily basis has an effect on health.

A wellness expert can identify areas where change is important.

A wellness expert not only helps identify those areas, but also creates a plan to help you do it. While the focus is always on the person receiving the help, their families and employers benefit, too. Healthy employees are more productive when they’re fit. Parents that are fit have more energy for their children. Best of all, the habits developed with the help of a wellness expert transfer to those children by example.

When you use the services of a wellness expert, the help doesn’t end at a recommendation.

Wellness experts don’t just tell you to quit smoking, they help you get into a smoking cessation program and stay in touch to provide support. They don’t tell you to lose weight, they line you up with nutritional counseling and exercise programs. They help you make the changes that will affect you for years to come by locating the services and resources you need to make those changes easier and more successfully.

  • Is stress tearing you apart? There are several ways to deal with it. A wellness expert can identify many and help you find the one that fits your needs best.
  • Wellness experts are good for both employees and employers. For employers, they help reduce sick days and can lower the cost of health insurance. For employees, they provide a service that makes getting and being healthier easier.
  • Wellness experts often work with physicians to provide more information in the areas that keep you healthier, beyond just traditional medical care.
  • A wellness coach provides information on topics that relate to good health. They help educate clients in ways to live both a healthier lifestyle and a happier one.

For more information, click here:  Traveltrim.com


5 Daily Habits That Will Set You Up for Success

It’s easy to live life on autopilot. Do you ever feel like you’re going through the motions during the workweek, just trying to make it to Friday? Then, when Friday rolls around, you can hardly remember what happened that week—it’s all one big blur.

Listen, folks. The typical schedule of get up, go to work, come home, watch TV, go to bed, and do it over again the next day is not going to get you where you want to be. I don’t want you to be full of regret in 30 years when you look back and realize you didn’t do anything you were truly passionate about!

In order to avoid living on autopilot and advance in your career, you have to be intentional with your time every day. That sounds like a big undertaking, but there are a few simple actions you can take on a daily basis to set yourself up for success—not just in your career, but in other areas of your life too.

The Top 5 Daily Habits for Personal and Professional Growth

Note: These aren’t shortcuts and will require some discipline, but I promise they will pay off! Whether you want to pursue a new career direction, take your current position to the next level, or simply grow as a person, practice these five things daily and you’ll see real results and opportunities coming your way.

Habit #1: Learn.

This can look different on a day-to-day basis, but the key is to learn something every day. It doesn’t matter if it’s small. Just carve out at least a few minutes to learn more about your craft, yourself and the industry you currently work in (or the one you want to work in).

Here are a few effective ways to learn:

  • Readnews articles, books, essays. It doesn’t matter what it is as long as what you’re reading helps you learn more about who you are and what you want to do.
  • Listento podcasts, radio and other people who know more than you do.
  • WatchTED talks, documentaries and speeches given by people who inspire you or are influential in your field.
  • Research the field you’re interested in, especially if you’re looking at making a career change. Find out what kinds of education or training you would need in order to make that transition and what kinds of jobs and salaries are available in your area. Or look for volunteer and internship opportunities with an organization you’re passionate about.

Just think—you could spend 10 minutes scrolling through Instagram on your phone, or you could spend that 10 minutes reading an article that teaches you about the job you want or the field you’re passionate about! You’ll be surprised by how much knowledge you can absorb by making a small, intentional effort every day.

Habit #2: Do.

Find ways to practice what you’ve been learning and hone your craft. Again, this will look different depending on the given day and your career of choice.

Maybe it means writing 200 words every day, even if you absolutely hate what you write (you’ll get better). Maybe it means volunteering with a company that can help build your skills. Maybe it’s as simple as trying a new recipe, working on a website, or redecorating a friend’s living room so you can build your interior design portfolio. Just find small ways to practice.

Habit #3: Connect.

Look for ways to connect with people who are doing what you want to do, or who are already excelling in an area where you want to improve. I’m not talking about speed networking or making superficial connections just so you can reap the benefits. But it’s always important to be mindful about the relationships you’re building and maintaining on a daily basis.

Whether it’s reaching out to an old friend via email, grabbing coffee with someone you want to learn from, talking with an acquaintance who works at a company you’d love to work for, asking a trusted coworker for feedback on a project, or even just spending a few minutes bonding with your current team—real relationships are crucial, no matter what industry you’re in.

Habit #4: Serve.

There’s a great quote from one of my heroes, Zig Ziglar, that says: “You can have everything in life you want if you will just help enough other people get what they want.” If you serve other people, it eventually comes back to you.

Now, you might be thinking: Ken, that’s shallow! Is it really serving if I’m hoping to get something in return?

Hang on—I’m not saying you should manipulate people into giving you what you want. I’m suggesting that you make serving others a daily practice. In fact, the world’s best leaders are the ones who lead by serving. The way to become successful is not to push and claw your way to the top, but to have an attitude of humility and put others before yourself. Trust me—people will remember that in the future.

Here’s another question to ask yourself: How can I serve the people around me today? Not just your boss and your coworkers, but also your friends, your family, the disgruntled employees at the grocery store—you name it.

This might look like picking up someone’s lunch order, offering to do something outside of your regular job responsibilities, genuinely listening to someone who needs to vent, or putting your phone away when you get home so you can play with your kids. The list of possibilities really is endless.

Habit #5: Reflect.

When you’re making progress in your career, it’s encouraging to record that progress. Take some time at the end of the day to reflect on what you did, even if it feels like you only took one small step forward. Those small steps lead to big victories!

Journaling can be a fun, no-pressure way to reflect on your day and get all of your thoughts and ideas down on paper. Many studies have found that journaling boosts your mental health by helping you cope with anxiety, stress and depression.

Not a journaler? Try writing down just one sentence about your day, keeping track of goals you accomplished, or storing all of your completed to-do lists in one place. And don’t forget about the art of gratitude: Jotting down at least three things you’re grateful for each day can really help you stay motivated and keep everything in perspective.

Are you interested in learning more about the habits and strategies of successful people? Tune into the “How They Got There” series on The Ken Coleman Showpodcast, where I talk with high achievers from all over the country about the steps they took to start living the dream!

Source https://www.daveramsey.com/blog/5-daily-habits-for-success


What are the different types of hepatitis viruses occurring around the world?

The five hepatitis viruses – A, B, C, D and E – are distinct; they can have different modes of transmission, affect different populations, and result in different health outcomes.

  • Hepatitis A is primarily spread when someone ingests the virus from contact with food, drinks, or objects contaminated by feces from an infected person or has close personal contact with someone who is infected. Hepatitis A does not cause chronic liver disease and is rarely fatal, but it can cause serious symptoms. Hepatitis A can be prevented through improved sanitation, food safety, and vaccination.

 

  • Hepatitis B is often spread during birth from an infected mother to her baby. Infection can also occur through contact with blood and other body fluids through injection drug use, unsterile medical equipment, and sexual contact. Hepatitis B is most common in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia, but is also high in the Amazon region of South America, the southern parts of eastern and central Europe, the Middle East and the Indian subcontinent. The hepatitis B virus can cause both acute and chronic infection, ranging in severity from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious, chronic illness. If infected at birth or during early childhood, people are more likely to develop a chronic infection, which can lead to liver cirrhosis or even liver cancer. Getting the hepatitis B vaccine is the most effective way to prevent hepatitis B. WHO recommends that all infants receive the hepatitis B vaccine as soon as possible after birth, followed by 2-3 additional doses. In many parts of the world, widespread infant vaccination programs have led to dramatic declines of new hepatitis B cases.

 

  • Hepatitis C is spread through contact with blood of an infected person. Infection can occur through injection drug use and unsafe medical injections and other medical procedures. Mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis C is also possible. Hepatitis C can cause both acute and chronic infections, but most people who get infected develop a chronic infection. A significant number of those who are chronically infected will develop liver cirrhosis or liver cancer. With new treatments, over 90% of people with hepatitis C can be cured within 2-3 months, reducing the risk of death from liver cancer and cirrhosis. The first step for people living with hepatitis C to benefit from treatments is to get tested and linked to care. There is currently no vaccine for hepatitis C but research in this area is ongoing.

 

  • Hepatitis D is passed through contact with infected blood. Hepatitis D only occurs in people who are already infected with the hepatitis B virus. People who are not already infected with hepatitis B can prevent hepatitis D by getting vaccinated against hepatitis B.

 

  • Hepatitis E is spread mainly through contaminated drinking water. Hepatitis E usually clears in 4-6 weeks so there is no specific treatment. However, pregnant women infected with hepatitis E are at considerable risk of mortality from this infection.  Hepatitis E is found worldwide, but the number of infections is highest in East and South Asia. Improved sanitation and food safety can help prevent new cases of hepatitis E. A vaccine to prevent hepatitis E has been developed and is licensed in China, but is not yet available elsewhere.

Source https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/worldhepday.htm


Fireworks Eye Safety

The numbers are clear: fireworks are dangerous, and the month around July 4th is the most dangerous time. According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission’s most recent annual fireworks injury report (PDF) fireworks caused eight deaths and nearly 13,000 injuries in 2017. Two-thirds of the fireworks injuries treated in emergency rooms happened between mid-June and mid-July.

The most recent Consumer Product Safety Commission report found that 14% of fireworks injuries were eye injuries. In the most severe cases, fireworks can rupture the globe of the eye, cause chemical and thermal burns, corneal abrasions and retinal detachment — all of which can cause permanent eye damage and vision loss.

Children and young adults are frequent victims. Children age 15 and under accounted for 36% of the total injuries, according to the commission’s report. And half of the injuries requiring an emergency room visit were to people age 20 or younger.

Even sparklers can be dangerous, as they burn at more than 2,000 degrees Farenheit. Sparklers were responsible for 1,200 of the injuries in the latest report, and a sparkler mishap caused one of the fireworks deaths reported in 2017.

The people injured by fireworks aren’t necessarily handling the explosives themselves. In fact, 65% of people injured by fireworks were bystanders, according to another study. The statistics don’t lie. Children and people not handling fireworks themselves are in as much danger as the people actually lighting fireworks.

What to Do for a Fireworks Eye Injury

Fireworks-related eye injuries can combine blunt force trauma, heat burns and chemical exposure. If an eye injury from fireworks occurs, it should be considered a medical emergency.

  • Seek medical attention immediately.
  • Do not rub your eyes.
  • Do not rinse your eyes.
  • Do not apply pressure.
  • Do not remove any objects that are stuck in the eye.
  • Do not apply ointments or take any blood-thinning pain medications such as aspirin or ibuprofen unless directed by a doctor.

Fireworks Safety Tips

The best way to avoid a potentially blinding fireworks injury is by attending a professional, public fireworks show rather than purchasing fireworks for home use.

If you attend or live near a professional fireworks show:

  • Respect safety barriers, follow all safety instructions and view fireworks from at least 500 feet away.
  • Do not touch unexploded fireworks; instead, immediately contact local fire or police departments to help.

For those who decide to purchase and use consumer fireworks in states where they are legal (PDF), follow these safety tips from the Consumer Product Safety Commission:

  • Do not allow young children to play with fireworks. Sparklers, a firework often considered by many to be the ideal “safe” device for the young, burn at very high temperatures and should be not be handled by young children. Children may not understand the danger involved with fireworks and may not act appropriately while using the devices or in case of emergency.
  • Older children should be permitted to use fireworks only under close adult supervision.
  • Do not allow any running or horseplay.
  • Set off fireworks outdoors in a clear area, away from houses, dry leaves, or grass and other flammable materials.
  • Keep a bucket of water nearby for emergencies and for pouring on fireworks that fail to ignite or explode.
  • Do not try to relight or handle malfunctioning or “dud” fireworks. Soak them with water and throw them away.
  • Be sure other people are out of range before lighting fireworks.
  • Never light fireworks in a container, especially a glass or metal container.
  • Keep unused fireworks away from firing areas.
  • Store fireworks in a cool, dry place.
  • Check instructions for special storage directions.
  • Observe local laws.
  • Never have any portion of your body directly over a firework while lighting.
  • Do not experiment with homemade fireworks.

Source https://www.aao.org/eye-health/tips-prevention/injuries-fireworks-eye-safety


Sun Safety

The sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays can damage your skin in as little as 15 minutes. Follow these recommendations to help protect yourself and your family.

Shade

You can reduce your risk of skin damage and skin cancer by seeking shade under an umbrella, tree, or other shelter before you need relief from the sun. Your best bet to protect your skin is to use sunscreen or wear protective clothing when you’re outside—even when you’re in the shade.

Clothing

When possible, long-sleeved shirts and long pants and skirts can provide protection from UV rays. Clothes made from tightly woven fabric offer the best protection. A wet T-shirt offers much less UV protection than a dry one, and darker colors may offer more protection than lighter colors. Some clothing certified under international standards comes with information on its ultraviolet protection factor.

If wearing this type of clothing isn’t practical, at least try to wear a T-shirt or a beach cover-up. Keep in mind that a typical T-shirt has an SPF rating lower than 15, so use other types of protection as well.

Hat

For the most protection, wear a hat with a brim all the way around that shades your face, ears, and the back of your neck. A tightly woven fabric, such as canvas, works best to protect your skin from UV rays. Avoid straw hats with holes that let sunlight through. A darker hat may offer more UV protection.

If you wear a baseball cap, you should also protect your ears and the back of your neck by wearing clothing that covers those areas, using a broad spectrum sunscreen with at least SPF 15, or by staying in the shade.

Sunglasses

Sunglasses protect your eyes from UV rays and reduce the risk of cataracts. They also protect the tender skin around your eyes from sun exposure.

Sunglasses that block both UVA and UVB rays offer the best protection. Most sunglasses sold in the United States, regardless of cost, meet this standard. Wrap-around sunglasses work best because they block UV rays from sneaking in from the side.

Sunscreen

Put on broad spectrum sunscreen with at least SPF 15 before you go outside, even on slightly cloudy or cool days. Don’t forget to put a thick layer on all parts of exposed skin. Get help for hard-to-reach places like your back. And remember, sunscreen works best when combined with other options to prevent UV damage.

How sunscreen works. Most sunscreen products work by absorbing, reflecting, or scattering sunlight. They contain chemicals that interact with the skin to protect it from UV rays. All products do not have the same ingredients; if your skin reacts badly to one product, try another one or call a doctor.

SPF. Sunscreens are assigned a sun protection factor (SPF) number that rates their effectiveness in blocking UV rays. Higher numbers indicate more protection. You should use a broad spectrum sunscreen with at least SPF 15.

Reapplication. Sunscreen wears off. Put it on again if you stay out in the sun for more than two hours and after swimming, sweating, or toweling off.

Expiration date. Check the sunscreen’s expiration date. Sunscreen without an expiration date has a shelf life of no more than three years, but its shelf life is shorter if it has been exposed to high temperatures.

Cosmetics. Some makeup and lip balms contain some of the same sun-protective ingredients used in sunscreens. If they do not have at least SPF 15, be sure to use other forms of protection as well, such as sunscreen and a wide-brimmed hat.

 

Source https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/basic_info/sun-safety.htm 


Too Much Fun in the Sun? 9 Tips for Protecting Your Skin!

The sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays can lead to skin cancer, the most common type of cancer in the United States, as well as wrinkles and blotchy skin. UW Dermatologist Dr. Andrea Kalus kindly provided these 9 tips for minimizing sun damage:

  1. Sunscreen should be the last defense. The first defenses are covering up with clothing or a hat, seeking shade when possible, and avoiding peak hours of sun exposure.
  2. Brand does not matter when purchasing sunscreen. Brand name and generic or store brands all use the same ingredients in sunscreen.
  3. Purchase a broad spectrum sunscreen SPF 30 or higher. SPF ratings protect against UVB range UV rays and sunscreens with the added label of “broad spectrum” have protection against UVA also. Protecting yourself against both is important in preventing sunburns and skin cancer as well as wrinkles. SPF 15 blocks 94% of UVB rays (the cancer causing rays), SPF 30 blocks 97%, and SPF 45 blocks 98%. After SPF 45, the increases in blockage percentage are minimal.
  4. Apply sunscreen 15-20 minutes before going outside and reapply every 2 hours for the sunscreen to remain effective.
  5. No sunscreen is actually waterproof. Sunscreens labeled “sweat-proof” or “water-resistant” only last 40-80 minutes. If you are swimming or sweating, sunscreen should be reapplied more often.
  6. Sunscreen expires. Sunscreen is just expensive lotion if you are using it beyond its 3 year expiration date.
  7. 40% of UV rays break through the clouds, so sunscreen should really be worn daily.
  8. Pay special attention to the little ones. Sunscreens contain chemicals that may be absorbed through the skin and in babies under 6 months, regular use of sunscreen may not be great. However, a baby getting a sunburned is probably worse than applying sunscreen when really needed. It is best to protect babies with clothing, accessories, and shade as often as possible.
  9. Don’t forget the sneaky spots! The top 5 places people forget to apply sunscreen are behind the knees, on their feet, on top of their hands, behind and on their ears, and on the scalp.

 

Source https://wholeu.uw.edu/2014/07/16/uvsafetymonth/