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Mental Health Myths and Facts

Mental Health Myths and Facts

Can you tell the difference between a mental health myth and fact? Learn the truth about the most common mental health myths.

 

Mental Health Problems Affect Everyone

 

Myth: Mental health problems don’t affect me.

Fact: Mental health problems are actually very common. In 2014, about:

  • One in five American adults experienced a mental health issue
  • One in 10 young people experienced a period of major depression
  • One in 25 Americans lived with a serious mental illness, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depression

Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States. It accounts for the loss of more than 41,000 American lives each year, more than double the number of lives lost to homicide. Learn more about mental health problems.

Myth: Children don’t experience mental health problems.

Fact: Even very young children may show early warning signs of mental health concerns. These mental health problems are often clinically diagnosable, and can be a product of the interaction of biological, psychological, and social factors.

Half of all mental health disorders show first signs before a person turns 14 years old, and three quarters of mental health disorders begin before age 24.

Unfortunately, less than 20% of children and adolescents with diagnosable mental health problems receive the treatment they need. Early mental health support can help a child before problems interfere with other developmental needs.

Myth: People with mental health problems are violent and unpredictable.

Fact: The vast majority of people with mental health problems are no more likely to be violent than anyone else. Most people with mental illness are not violent and only 3%–5% of violent acts can be attributed to individuals living with a serious mental illness. In fact, people with severe mental illnesses are over 10 times more likely to be victims of violent crime than the general population. You probably know someone with a mental health problem and don’t even realize it, because many people with mental health problems are highly active and productive members of our communities.

Myth: People with mental health needs, even those who are managing their mental illness, cannot tolerate the stress of holding down a job.

Fact: People with mental health problems are just as productive as other employees. Employers who hire people with mental health problems report good attendance and punctuality as well as motivation, good work, and job tenure on par with or greater than other employees.

When employees with mental health problems receive effective treatment, it can result in:

  • Lower total medical costs
  • Increased productivity
  • Lower absenteeism
  • Decreased disability costs

Myth: Personality weakness or character flaws cause mental health problems. People with mental health problems can snap out of it if they try hard enough.

Fact: Mental health problems have nothing to do with being lazy or weak and many people need help to get better. Many factors contribute to mental health problems, including:

  • Biological factors, such as genes, physical illness, injury, or brain chemistry
  • Life experiences, such as trauma or a history of abuse
  • Family history of mental health problems

People with mental health problems can get better and many recover completely.

 

Helping Individuals with Mental Health Problems

 

Myth: There is no hope for people with mental health problems. Once a friend or family member develops mental health problems, he or she will never recover.

Fact: Studies show that people with mental health problems get better and many recover completely. Recovery refers to the process in which people are able to live, work, learn, and participate fully in their communities. There are more treatments, services, and community support systems than ever before, and they work.

Myth: Therapy and self-help are a waste of time. Why bother when you can just take a pill?

Fact: Treatment for mental health problems varies depending on the individual and could include medication, therapy, or both. Many individuals work with a support system during the healing and recovery process.

Myth: I can’t do anything for a person with a mental health problem.

Fact: Friends and loved ones can make a big difference. Only 44% of adults with diagnosable mental health problems and less than 20% of children and adolescents receive needed treatment. Friends and family can be important influences to help someone get the treatment and services they need by:

  • Reaching out and letting them know you are available to help
  • Helping them access mental health services
  • Learning and sharing the facts about mental health, especially if you hear something that isn’t true
  • Treating them with respect, just as you would anyone else
  • Refusing to define them by their diagnosis or using labels such as “crazy”

Myth: Prevention doesn’t work. It is impossible to prevent mental illnesses.

Fact: Prevention of mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders focuses on addressing known risk factors such as exposure to trauma that can affect the chances that children, youth, and young adults will develop mental health problems. Promoting the social-emotional well-being of children and youth leads to:

  • Higher overall productivity
  • Better educational outcomes
  • Lower crime rates
  • Stronger economies
  • Lower health care costs
  • Improved quality of life
  • Increased lifespan
  • Improved family life

Source https://www.mentalhealth.gov/basics/mental-health-myths-facts


4 Ways to Make Temporary Income During the Coronavirus

Hey, fam. I know this is a super weird, hard time for many, and you might be feeling scared right now—especially if you’ve been laid off or you’re on unpaid leave because of the coronavirus (COVID-19). First of all, if that’s your situation, I just want to say I’m so sorry. Take a deep breath and know that you’re not alone.

If you were still working on paying off debt at the time of your unpaid leave, here’s what I want you to do: Press pause on your debt snowball and just make sure you can cover the Four Walls—food, utilities, shelter and transportation—until you can get back on your feet.

In overwhelming situations like this, focus on what you can control (your own actions) and start applying for some jobs. Don’t let the news fill you with fear—even though it might look like the world is ending, there are actually a lot of companies that are hiring right now. I’ve made a list of some of the best jobs and side hustles you can look for to get you through these crazy economic times. I promise, we will get through this.

4 Temporary Jobs in High Demand During the Coronavirus Pandemic

While tons of companies have closed their doors, the need for other businesses like grocery stores and restaurants that deliver has skyrocketed. Here are four of the most in-demand career fields where companies are currently hiring.

And y’all probably know this already, but check local places too. All of the companies listed here are national chains, but there might be local grocery stores, hospitals or restaurants in your area that are hiring too. Since these are the places that are considered “essential,” pretty much any workers in the food, delivery, tech or medical field are going to be super needed right now!

1. Grocery/Retail

Someone has to restock all of that hand sanitizer, right? Grocery stores and retail/food combination stores are some of the only places people are actually allowed to go to right now, so it makes sense that these businesses would be overwhelmed and looking for some extra hands.

Many of these places have come out with press releases saying that they’re planning on hiring thousands of temporary workers during this crisis to help those who are missing paychecks. Even if it’s temporary, it’s better than nothing—and some may turn into full-time opportunities later. Here are some places that are actively hiring:

  • Aldi
  • Costco
  • CVS
  • Dollar General
  • Dollar Tree
  • Kroger
  • Publix
  • Sprouts
  • Target
  • Walmart
  • Whole Foods

2. Delivery

Bless all of the delivery drivers who are making sure people get what they need—even during a global pandemic. The good thing about these jobs is that most of your time will be spent in your car, so you can listen to music or podcasts and make minimal human contact. Here are the delivery services that are hiring right now:

  • Chipotle
  • PepsiCo
  • Domino’s
  • FedEx
  • Instacart
  • Jet’s Pizza
  • Papa John’s
  • Pizza Hut
  • Postmates
  • Shipt
  • UPS
  • Uber Eats

3. Medicine/Health Care

Sure, not everyone has the training or education for a job in the medical field, but if you do, now’s the time to use it! And don’t write off these places because you don’t think you qualify—some health care companies and hospitals will need receptionists, admins or other workers who might not fit the roles you’d typically think of. Here are some of the places in the medical field that are hiring:

  • Ascension
  • CVS
  • GE Healthcare
  • Mercy Health
  • Rite Aid
  • Walgreens

4. Technology

With so many people working and chilling at home these days, companies like the ones on this list need people with tech skills (and other skills) who can help them meet the demand for all those video meetings and binge-watching sessions. Jobs in this category range from customer support to IT to design. Here are just a few of those companies that are hiring currently:

  • Apple
  • Google
  • Hulu
  • Microsoft
  • Netflix
  • Slack
  • Zoom

Side Hustles You Can Start While Social Distancing

There are plenty of things you can do to make extra cash during this crazy situation that don’t necessarily involve a specific company and will allow you to build your own schedule—which is dope if you have kids and need something more flexible. Grab your entrepreneurial spirit and see if you can get something going with one of these side hustles.

  • Tutoring online: With so many kids missing school right now, you could offer virtual tutoring services in math, science, English, ACT/SAT prep, music, art or whatever your area of expertise is. You could also go through an online tutoring platform like Tutor.com or VIPKid to teach kids all across the country—and the world! (Dude, technology is the best.)
  • Freelance writing/editing: People are reading online content more than ever right now, so look for online platforms that need writers and copy editors. (If you have the skills and know how to use the right your, then trust me—people need you.)
  • Cleaning services: Businesses (or moms) may need some extra help cleaning their space up to CDC standards. You can reach out to people or business individually, or you can look into joining a franchise like Molly Maid that sends people out on an as-needed basis. Be choosy about which jobs you take, though—your health and safety come first.
  • Babysitting/nannying: Now this is a tricky one, because you definitely don’t want to put your health (or anyone else’s) on the line. But there are plenty of parents working in those “essential” jobs who still need someone to watch their kids. Use your best judgment here, and obviously, if you or someone in your family is sick, turn the job down. And if the family has elderly or other at-risk people living with them, don’t put them in harm’s way by coming into their home.
  • Web or graphic design: Anything you can do from home on your computer is obviously a great option right now. People still need websites built and products designed, so offer your services via Craigslist or social media, or go through a site like Fivver.
  • Security: If you have the right training and qualifications, check with local businesses or even hospitals to see if they’re looking to hire extra security people during this crazy season.
  • Taking surveys: Sites like Survey Junkie or Vindale Research will pay you to take surveys online (how easy is that?). They don’t pay super great, so you might have to take a bunch of them before they add up, but every little bit helps.
  • Transcribing audio files: Y’all, check out Rev— with some basic training and certification, you can get paid to transcribe recorded or live audio files for the medical industry, legal industry, etc.

You guys, I hope these lists will at least get you started with some ideas for making extra money during your unpaid leave or job layoff. I know things are tough right now, but don’t panic. There’s a light at the end of the tunnel, and I got your back if you need some help and encouragement along the way.

Source https://www.daveramsey.com/blog/ways-to-make-temporary-income


Health Threats From High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure threatens your health and quality of life

In most cases, the damage done by high blood pressure (HBP, or hypertension) takes place over time. Left undetected (or uncontrolled), high blood pressure can lead to:

  • Heart attack — High blood pressure damages arteries that can become blocked and prevent blood flow to the heart muscle.
  • Stroke — High blood pressure can cause blood vessels in the brain to clog more easily or even burst.
  • Heart failure — The increased workload from high blood pressure can cause the heart to enlarge and fail to supply blood to the body.
  • Kidney disease or failure — High blood pressure can damage the arteries around the kidneys and interfere with their ability to filter blood effectively.
  • Vision loss — High blood pressure can strain or damage blood vessels in the eyes.
  • Sexual dysfunction — High blood pressure can lead to erectile dysfunction in men or lower libido in women.
  • Angina — Over time, high blood pressure can lead to heart disease or microvascular disease (MVD). Angina, or chest pain, is a common symptom.
  • Peripheral artery disease (PAD) — Atherosclerosis caused by high blood pressure can cause a narrowing of arteries in the legs, arms, stomach and head, causing pain or fatigue.

Source https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/high-blood-pressure/health-threats-from-high-blood-pressure


5 Surprising Facts About High Blood Pressure

What you don’t know about high blood pressure could hurt you. High blood pressure affects one in three Americans,1 yet many people with the condition don’t know they have it.

 

Uncontrolled high blood pressure raises the risk for heart disease and stroke, which are leading causes of death in the United States. Fortunately, high blood pressure is treatable and preventable. To lower your risk, get your blood pressure checked regularly and take action to control your blood pressure if it is too high.

  1. High blood pressure may be linked to dementia.

Recent studies show that high blood pressure is linked to a higher risk for dementia, a loss of cognitive function.2 Timing seems to matter: Some evidence suggests having uncontrolled high blood pressure during midlife (age 45 to 65) creates a higher risk for dementia later in life.3 The takeaway? It’s never too early to start thinking about your blood pressure and taking steps to manage it.

2. Young people can have high blood pressure, too.

High blood pressure doesn’t just happen to older adults. About one in four men and nearly one in five women age 35 to 44 has high blood pressure.4

High blood pressure is a leading cause of stroke, a condition that is on the rise among younger people. Experts think the increased risk for stroke among young adults is a direct result of the rising rates of obesity, high blood pressure, and diabetes—conditions that are preventable and treatable.

Younger people should get their blood pressure checked at least once each year. You can get your blood pressure checked at a doctor’s office, a pharmacy, or at many grocery stores.

3. High blood pressure usually doesn’t have any symptoms.

High blood pressure is sometimes called the “silent killer.” Most people with high blood pressure don’t have any symptoms, such as sweating or headaches. Because many people feel fine, they don’t think they need to get their blood pressure checked. Even if you feel normal, your health may be at risk. Talk to your doctor about your risk for high blood pressure.

4. Many people who have high blood pressure don’t know it.

About 11 million U.S. adults with high blood pressure aren’t even aware they have it and are not receiving treatment to control their blood pressure.1Most people with uncontrolled blood pressure have health insurance and visit a health care provider at least twice a year, but the condition remains undiagnosed, hidden from the doctor and patient.5 CDC is working with providers to find patients with high blood pressure who are ” hiding in plain sight.” Ask your provider what your blood pressure numbers mean and whether they are too high. Stick to your treatment plan and follow your provider’s advice if you are diagnosed with high blood pressure.

What You Can Do By living a healthy lifestyle, you can help keep your blood pressure in a healthy range and lower your risk for heart disease and stroke. A healthy lifestyle includes

  • Eating a healthy diet
  • Maintaining a healthy weight
  • Getting enough physical activity
  • Not smoking
  • Limiting alcohol use Learn more about steps you can take to prevent high blood pressure.

5. Women and minorities face unique risks when it comes to high blood pressure.

Women with high blood pressure who become pregnant are more likely to have complications during pregnancy than those with normal blood pressure. High blood pressure can harm a mother’s kidneys and other organs, and it can cause low birth weight and early delivery. Certain types of birth control can also raise a woman’s risk for high blood pressure. Women with high blood pressure who want to become pregnant should work with their health care team to lower their blood pressure before becoming pregnant.

African American men and women have higher rates of high blood pressure than any other race or ethnic group.4 These individuals are also more likely to be hospitalized for high blood pressure. Experts think this is related to higher rates of obesity, diabetes, and stroke among this group. Lifestyle changes, such as reducing sodium in your diet, getting more physical activity, and reducing stress, can help lower blood pressure.

Source https://www.cdc.gov/features/highbloodpressure/index.html


Sun Safety

The sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays can damage your skin in as little as 15 minutes. Check the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s UV Index for your area, and follow these recommendations to help protect yourself and your family.

Shade

You can reduce your risk of skin damage and skin cancer by seeking shade under an umbrella, tree, or other shelter before you need relief from the sun. Your best bet to protect your skin is to use sunscreen or wear protective clothing when you’re outside—even when you’re in the shade.

Clothing

When possible, long-sleeved shirts and long pants and skirts can provide protection from UV rays. Clothes made from tightly woven fabric offer the best protection. A wet T-shirt offers much less UV protection than a dry one, and darker colors may offer more protection than lighter colors. Some clothing certified under international standards comes with information on its ultraviolet protection factor.

If wearing this type of clothing isn’t practical, at least try to wear a T-shirt or a beach cover-up. Keep in mind that a typical T-shirt has an SPF rating lower than 15, so use other types of protection as well.

Hat

For the most protection, wear a hat with a brim all the way around that shades your face, ears, and the back of your neck. A tightly woven fabric, such as canvas, works best to protect your skin from UV rays. Avoid straw hats with holes that let sunlight through. A darker hat may offer more UV protection.

If you wear a baseball cap, you should also protect your ears and the back of your neck by wearing clothing that covers those areas, using a broad spectrum sunscreen with at least SPF 15, or by staying in the shade.

Sunglasses

Sunglasses protect your eyes from UV rays and reduce the risk of cataracts. They also protect the tender skin around your eyes from sun exposure.

Sunglasses that block both UVA and UVB rays offer the best protection. Most sunglasses sold in the United States, regardless of cost, meet this standard. Wrap-around sunglasses work best because they block UV rays from sneaking in from the side.

Sunscreen

Put on broad spectrum sunscreen with at least SPF 15 before you go outside, even on slightly cloudy or cool days. Don’t forget to put a thick layer on all parts of exposed skin. Get help for hard-to-reach places like your back. And remember, sunscreen works best when combined with other options to prevent UV damage.

How sunscreen works. Most sunscreen products work by absorbing, reflecting, or scattering sunlight. They contain chemicals that interact with the skin to protect it from UV rays. All products do not have the same ingredients; if your skin reacts badly to one product, try another one or call a doctor.

SPF. Sunscreens are assigned a sun protection factor (SPF) number that rates their effectiveness in blocking UV rays. Higher numbers indicate more protection. You should use a broad spectrum sunscreen with at least SPF 15.

Reapplication. Sunscreen wears off. Put it on again if you stay out in the sun for more than two hours and after swimming, sweating, or toweling off.

Expiration date. Check the sunscreen’s expiration date. Sunscreen without an expiration date has a shelf life of no more than three years, but its shelf life is shorter if it has been exposed to high temperatures.

Cosmetics. Some makeup and lip balms contain some of the same sun-protective ingredients used in sunscreens. If they do not have at least SPF 15, be sure to use other forms of protection as well, such as sunscreen and a wide-brimmed hat.

Source https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/basic_info/sun-safety.htm


Suicidal Behavior

Suicide causes immeasurable pain, suffering, and loss to individuals, families, and communities nationwide. On average, 112 Americans die by suicide each day. Suicide is the second leading cause of death among 15-24 year olds and more than 9.4 million adults in the United States had serious thoughts of suicide within the past 12 months. But suicide is preventable, so it’s important to know what to do. For more information, go to www.sprc.org

 

Warning Signs of Suicide

If someone you know is showing one or more of the following behaviors, he or she may be thinking about suicide. Don’t ignore these warning signs. Get help immediately.

  • Talking about wanting to die or to kill oneself
  • Looking for a way to kill oneself
  • Talking about feeling hopeless or having no reason to live
  • Talking about feeling trapped or in unbearable pain
  • Talking about being a burden to others
  • Increasing the use of alcohol or drugs
  • Acting anxious or agitated; behaving recklessly
  • Sleeping too little or too much
  • Withdrawing or feeling isolated
  • Showing rage or talking about seeking revenge
  • Displaying extreme mood swings

 

Get Help

If you or someone you know needs help, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255). Trained crisis workers are available to talk 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

If you think someone is in immediate danger, do not leave him or her alone—stay there and call 911.

Source https://www.mentalhealth.gov/what-to-look-for/suicidal-behavior


Food Allergy Myths and Misconceptions

FARE is dedicated to speaking up for the 32 million Americans with food allergies, including all those at risk for life-threatening anaphylaxis.

Whether you live with food allergies or care for someone who does, brushing up on the facts is a great place to start. You can show your support for the food allergy community by helping to dispel these popular myths and misconceptions.

Myth: Each allergic reaction will get worse and worse.

Fact: Food allergy reactions are unpredictable.

 

Myths and Misconceptions

 

  1. Myth: Food allergies aren’t serious.

Fact: This is more than just an itch or a stomachache. Food allergies can cause symptoms from hives and a stuffy nose, to vomiting, difficulty breathing and loss of consciousness. If an allergic reaction is severe or involves several parts of the body, it becomes anaphylaxis and can be life-threatening.

Food allergies are not only potentially life-threatening, they’re life-altering. People with food allergies must always be vigilant to ensure they avoid reactions.

 

  1. Myth: Eating a little bit won’t hurt.

Fact: For someone with a food allergy, even a trace of a food allergen can trigger a severe reaction. You must remove the allergen completely from your diet to stay safe and live well.

Avoiding cross-contact between a safe food and your food allergen is just as important as avoiding the allergen itself. Cross-contact occurs when an allergen is accidentally transferred from one food to another. The food that was safe before is now dangerous for people with that food allergy.

 

  1. Myth: Each allergic reaction will get worse and worse.

Fact: Food allergy reactions are unpredictable. The way your body reacts to a food allergen one time cannot predict how it will react the next time. You don’t know if a reaction is going to be mild, moderate or severe. You should always be prepared with emergency medication, just in case.

 

  1. Myth: A food allergy that has only caused mild reactions is a mild food allergy.

Fact: There are no mild or severe food allergies—only mild to severe reactions. What caused a mild reaction in the past may lead to a severe reaction in the future, and vice versa. Never let your guard down. Always take precautions to prevent allergic reactions before they happen.

From the moment you know or suspect you or a loved one has ingested an allergen, take action. Even mild symptoms can quickly progress to a severe reaction, or anaphylaxis. You should be watchful and prepared to give medication—seconds count!

It is important for every person with life-threatening food allergies to have an individualized food allergy action plan. This document explains the symptoms of an allergic reaction and what medication(s) you should take for each symptom(s).

 

  1. Myth: Food allergies are the same as food intolerances.

Fact: Unlike food intolerances, food allergies are “IgE- mediated.” This means that your immune system produces an antibody called immunoglobulin E (IgE for short) when it detects a food allergen. IgE antibodies fight the “enemy” food by releasing histamine and other chemicals. These chemicals then trigger the symptoms of an allergic reaction.

Food intolerances do not involve the immune system. And while they can cause great discomfort, they are not life-threatening. A food allergy, on the other hand, can be fatal. Learn more about food intolerances.

 

  1. Myth: Peanut is the most common food allergy in kids.

Fact: Milk and eggs are actually the most common food allergies in children—although peanuts do get a lot of attention for causing severe reactions.

All food allergies, no matter how common or rare, are serious.

 

  1. Myth: Peanut is the most “dangerous” food allergy.

Fact: No single food allergy poses a greater threat than another. While only eight foods (milk, egg, peanut, tree nuts, soy, wheat, fish and shellfish) account for the vast majority of food allergies, virtually any food can cause an allergic reaction. And even a very small amount of the problem food is enough to cause a reaction.

 

  1. Myth: All allergy-inducing ingredients must be listed on food labels.

According to the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act (FALCPA), the eight most common allergens must be labeled on packaged foods sold in the U.S. These allergens are milk, egg, peanut, tree nuts, soy, wheat, fish and shellfish.

This federal law, which took effect January 1, 2006, states that these ingredients must be listed if they are present in any amount. They should be featured clearly and in plain language, even if they appear in colors, flavors or spice blends. However, people can be allergic to foods other than the eight most common. These allergens can appear in surprising places, and they may not be listed on food labels.

Always read food packaging labels and ask questions about ingredients before eating a food that you have not prepared yourself.

 

9.Misconception: If a food doesn’t traditionally contain an allergen, or you don’t see the allergen listed in the description, it’s safe to eat.

Fact: Allergens can appear in unexpected places. For example, fish or shellfish are sometimes dipped in milk to reduce their fishy odor, posing a problem for people with milk allergy.

Never assume anything about how a food has been made or served. Always read food labels and ask questions about ingredients before eating a food that you have not prepared yourself.

 

10.Misconception: I have a food allergy because my skin or blood tests were positive.

Fact: Positive skin prick and blood tests are not always accurate. About 50 to 60 percent of these tests can give “false positive” results. This means that the test is positive even though you are not allergic to the food being tested.

It is important to discuss test results with your primary care doctor or an allergist. He or she will interpret them based on your history. If it is unclear whether you have a food allergy, an oral food challenge can help. For this procedure, a healthcare professional will closely supervise as you consume the food in question.

Learn more about diagnostic tests for food allergies.

 

  1. Myth: A food allergy always develops in childhood. Then you’re stuck with it for life.

Fact: You can develop a food allergy at any age, even to a food that you’ve safely eaten before.

Children may outgrow a food allergy over time. This is common with allergies to milk, egg, soy, and wheat. Allergies that are harder to outgrow include peanut, tree nuts, fish and shellfish.

Source https://www.foodallergy.org/resources/food-allergy-myths-and-misconceptions


Arthritis pain: Do’s and don’ts

Will physical activity reduce or increase your arthritis pain? Get tips on exercise and other common concerns when coping with arthritis symptoms and arthritis pain.

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Arthritis is a leading cause of pain and disability worldwide. You can find plenty of advice about easing the pain of arthritis and other conditions with exercise, medication and stress reduction. How do you know what will work for you?

Here are some do’s and don’ts to help you figure it out.

Whatever your condition, it will be easier to stay ahead of your pain if you:

  • Learn all you can about your condition, including what type of arthritis you have and whether any of your joints are already damaged
  • Enlist your doctor, friends and family in managing your pain
  • Tell your doctor if your pain changes

Pay attention to your joints, whether sitting, standing or engaging in activity.

  • Keep your joints moving.Do daily, gentle stretches that move your joints through their full range of motion.
  • Use good posture.A physical therapist can show you how to sit, stand and move correctly.
  • Know your limits.Balance activity and rest, and don’t overdo.

In addition, lifestyle changes are important for easing pain.

  • Manage weight.Being overweight can increase complications of arthritis and contribute to arthritis pain. Making incremental, permanent lifestyle changes resulting in gradual weight loss is often the most effective method of weight management.
  • Quit smoking.Smoking causes stress on connective tissues, which can increase arthritis pain.

When you have arthritis, movement can decrease your pain and stiffness, improve your range of motion, strengthen your muscles, and increase your endurance.

What to do

Choose the right kinds of activities — those that build the muscles around your joints but don’t damage the joints themselves. A physical or occupational therapist can help you develop an exercise program that’s right for you.

Focus on stretching, range-of-motion exercises and gradual progressive strength training. Include low-impact aerobic exercise, such as walking, cycling or water exercises, to improve your mood and help control your weight.

What to avoid

Avoid activities that involve high impact and repetitive motion, such as:

  • Running
  • Jumping
  • Tennis
  • High-impact aerobics
  • Repeating the same movement, such as a tennis serve, again and again

Many types of medications are available for arthritis pain relief. Most are relatively safe, but no medication is completely free of side effects. Talk with your doctor to formulate a medication plan for your specific pain symptoms.

What to do

Over-the-counter pain medications, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) or naproxen sodium (Aleve) can help relieve occasional pain triggered by activity your muscles and joints aren’t used to — such as gardening after a winter indoors.

Cream containing capsaicin may be applied to skin over a painful joint to relieve pain. Use alone or with oral medication.

Consult your doctor if over-the-counter medications don’t relieve your pain.

What to avoid

  • Talk with your doctor if you find yourself using over-the-counter pain relievers regularly.
  • Don’t try to ignore severe and prolonged arthritis pain. You might have joint inflammation or damage requiring daily medication.
  • Focusing only on pain.Depression is more common in people with arthritis. Doctors have found that treating depression with antidepressants and other therapies reduces not only depression symptoms but also arthritis pain.

It’s no surprise that arthritis pain has a negative effect on your mood. If everyday activities make you hurt, you’re bound to feel discouraged. But when these normal feelings escalate to create a constant refrain of fearful, hopeless thoughts, your pain can actually get worse and harder to manage.

What to do

Therapies that interrupt destructive mind-body interactions include:

  • Cognitive behavioral therapy.This well-studied, effective combination of talk therapy and behavior modification helps you identify — and break — cycles of self-defeating thoughts and actions.
  • Relaxation therapy.Meditating, doing yoga, deep breathing, listening to music, being in nature, writing in a journal — do whatever helps you relax. There’s no downside to relaxation, and it can help ease pain.
  • Some people get pain relief through acupuncture treatments, when a trained acupuncturist inserts hair-thin needles at specific points on your body. It can take several weeks before you notice improvement.
  • Heat and cold.Use of heat, such as applying heating pads to aching joints, taking hot baths or showers, or immersing painful joints in warm paraffin wax, can help relieve pain temporarily. Be careful not to burn yourself. Use heating pads for no more than 20 minutes at a time.

Use of cold, such as applying ice packs to sore muscles, can relieve pain and inflammation after strenuous exercise.

  • Massage might improve pain and stiffness temporarily. Make sure your massage therapist knows where your arthritis affects you.

What to avoid

  • If you’re addicted to tobacco, you might use it as an emotional coping tool. But it’s counterproductive: Toxins in smoke cause stress on connective tissue, leading to more joint problems.
  • A negative attitude.Negative thoughts are self-perpetuating. As long as you dwell on them, they escalate, which can increase your pain and risk of disability. Instead, distract yourself with activities you enjoy, spend time with people who support you and consider talking to a therapist.

Source https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/arthritis/in-depth/arthritis/ART-20046440?p=1


8 Natural Therapies for Arthritis Pain

1.     Acupuncture

This form of Chinese medicine involves inserting thin, small needles through the skin at specific acupoints on the body. It is designed to stimulate nerves, muscles and connective tissue, improve blood flow and activate the body’s natural painkillers. Best for: osteoarthritis, fibromyalgia, low back pain, neck and shoulder pain, bursitis, carpel tunnel syndrome

 

2.     Massage

Gentle manipulation with moderate pressure has been shown to reduce joint pain and stiffness, and even improve range of motion. However, timing is important. Listen to your body. Massage may not be as helpful during a very active flare when joints are especially tender and sensitive. Best for: osteoarthritis, low back pain, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis

 

3.     Tai Chi

Tai chi is a Chinese practice that combines gentle flowing movements, deep breathing and meditation. It has been shown to not only reduce joint pain, but also improve range of motion and function, as well as feelings of well-being. The Arthritis Foundation offers a Tai Chi DVD specifically created for people with arthritis. Best for: fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis

 

4.     Yoga

Yoga is an Indian practice that uses deep breathing, meditation and body poses. It has been shown to decrease joint pain and stiffness, as well as improve relaxation and reduce stress. The Arthritis Foundation offers a Yoga DVD specifically created for people with arthritis. Best for: fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, low back pain

 

5.     Weight Loss

Losing one pound removes four pounds of pressure on swollen, painful joints. Maintain a healthy weight by combining a balanced diet with regular physical activity. Make sure you choose food from the five important food groups (fruits, vegetable, lean protein, low-fat dairy and whole grains). Try to do 30 minutes of low-impact exercise five days a week. Best for: osteoarthritis

 

6.     Physical Therapy

Physical therapists can provide various ways to reduce strain and pressure on painful and swollen joints. These include manual therapy and counseling on proper positioning and body movement. They can also recommend assistive devices such as braces and splints to support joints and shoe inserts to relieve stress on the lower extremities. Best for: all forms of joint pain (back, knee, shoulder, hand, wrist, ankle)

 

7.     Topical Gels

These gels work by stimulating sensory nerve endings in the skin, and the body responds by reducing pain signals through the nervous system, according to Doreen Stiskal, PhD, chair of the physical therapy department at Seton Hall University in South Orange, N.J. Voltaren Gel and capsaicin cream are two options. Best for: osteoarthritis

 

8.     TENS

Often used by physical therapists and chiropractors, transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TENS) is a form of electrical stimulation used to relieve pain. Small electrodes are placed on the affected area and electromagnetic current is delivered through the skin. Best for: osteoarthritis

Source https://www.arthritis.org/health-wellness/treatment/complementary-therapies/natural-therapies/8-natural-therapies-for-arthritis-pain


Types of Strokes

The type of stroke you have affects your treatment and recovery.

The three main types of stroke are:

 

Ischemic Stroke

Most strokes (87%) are ischemic strokes.1 An ischemic stroke happens when blood flow through the artery that supplies oxygen-rich blood to the brain becomes blocked.

Blood clots often cause the blockages that lead to ischemic strokes.

 

Hemorrhagic Stroke

A hemorrhagic stroke happens when an artery in the brain leaks blood or ruptures (breaks open). The leaked blood puts too much pressure on brain cells, which damages them.

High blood pressure and aneurysms—balloon-like bulges in an artery that can stretch and burst—are examples of conditions that can cause a hemorrhagic stroke.

There are two types of hemorrhagic strokes:

  • Intracerebral hemorrhage is the most common type of hemorrhagic stroke. It occurs when an artery in the brain bursts, flooding the surrounding tissue with blood.
  • Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a less common type of hemorrhagic stroke. It refers to bleeding in the area between the brain and the thin tissues that cover it.

 

Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA)

A transient ischemic attack (TIA) is sometimes called a “mini-stroke.” It is different from the major types of stroke because blood flow to the brain is blocked for only a short time—usually no more than 5 minutes.2

It is important to know that:

  • A TIA is a warning sign of a future stroke.
  • A TIA is a medical emergency, just like a major stroke.
  • Strokes and TIAs require emergency care. Call 9-1-1 right away if you feel signs of a stroke or see symptoms in someone around you.
  • There is no way to know in the beginning whether symptoms are from a TIA or from a major type of stroke.
  • Like ischemic strokes, blood clots often cause TIAs.
  • More than a third of people who have a TIA and don’t get treatment have a major stroke within 1 year. As many as 10% to 15% of people will have a major stroke within 3 months of a TIA.2

Recognizing and treating TIAs can lower the risk of a major stroke. If you have a TIA, your health care team can find the cause and take steps to prevent a major stroke.

Source https://www.cdc.gov/stroke/types_of_stroke.htm